• a libel law
  • 名誉毀損法
  • libel damages
  • 名誉毀損の賠償金
  • Acting on legal advice, Barnes sued Raith for libel and engaged Sydney's leading barrister, Jack Shand KC, as counsel.
  • Wikipedia: Sid Barnes
  • After the libel trial, Johnson resigned from the board on 9 February 1953, and played no further part in cricket administration in Australia.
  • Wikipedia: Keith Johnson (cricket administrator)
  • As a result of his libel case, he had become increasingly interested in law and began seeking someone to teach him.
  • Wikipedia: Thomas R. Marshall
  • Bauer disputes this, arguing that the story of Brand being forced to go to Palestine was spread around Israel during the 1953 libel trial in Jerusalem of Malchiel Greenwald, a freelance writer who, in a self-published pamphlet, had accused Brand's colleague on the Aid and Rescue Committee, Rudolf Kastner (by then an Israeli government spokesman), of having collaborated with the Nazis.
  • Wikipedia: Joel Brand
  • Darby eventually brought suit for libel against Kendall and Eliza Sharp, as well as Senator Beauchamp and Sharp's brother Leander.
  • Wikipedia: Beauchamp–Sharp Tragedy
  • During the reign of Henry VII, the Star Chamber, a court formerly reserved for trial of serious offences such as rioting, assumed jurisdiction over scandalum magnatum, as well as libel and slander, cases.
  • Wikipedia: Privilege of peerage
  • He punished libel with exile or death and, due to his suspicious nature, increasingly accepted information from informers to bring false charges of treason if necessary.
  • Wikipedia: Domitian
  • He responded by bringing suit for libel against the Union Leader and its lead investigator.
  • Wikipedia: Murray Chotiner
  • He subsequently won an undisclosed sum in libel damages for defamatory news articles published following his arrest.
  • Wikipedia: Murder of Joanna Yeates
  • In 1799, he was indicted on charges of seditious libel for publishing a pamphlet by the Unitarian minister Gilbert Wakefield.
  • Wikipedia: Joseph Johnson (publisher)
  • In 1812 he prosecuted Leigh Hunt for seditious libel against the Prince Regent; thanks to his work, Hunt was found guilty, reversing the judgment of a 1811 trial in which he had been acquitted.
  • Wikipedia: William Garrow
  • In 1895, Wilde unsuccessfully sued Lord Alfred's father, the Marquess of Queensberry, for libel.
  • Wikipedia: Cleveland Street scandal
  • In January 1957 Waugh avenged the Spain–Noel-Buxton intrusion by winning libel damages from the Express and Spain.
  • Wikipedia: Evelyn Waugh
  • In late 1553 or 1554, on the suggestion of his favorite doctor and dentist, the Spanish Jew Moses Hamon, the Sultan issued a firman formally denouncing blood libels against the Jews.
  • Wikipedia: Suleiman the Magnificent
  • Like Williams, he was prosecuted for seditious libel and blasphemous libel.
  • Wikipedia: The Age of Reason
  • On October 15, 1840, in the Ottoman capital he had a meeting with Lord Ponsonby, to whom Montefiore suggested that following the precedent set by Suleiman the Magnificent, the sultan should issue a decree (firman) formally denouncing the blood libel and effectively sealing the cases both in Rhodes and in Damascus.
  • Wikipedia: Rhodes blood libel
  • Shelley Fisher Fishkin writes that, given the timing and Twain's views, the story may have been inspired by The Shambles of Science and the libel trial.
  • Wikipedia: Brown Dog affair
  • The allegations against Kastner became part of a libel case in Jerusalem in 1954, after Malchiel Gruenwald, an Israeli hotelier, accused him in a self-published pamphlet of being a Nazi collaborator.
  • Wikipedia: Rudolf Vrba
  • The Analytical Review suspended publication in December 1798 after the deaths of Christie (1796) and Wollstonecraft (1797), the conviction of Johnson for seditious libel (1798), and the retirement of other contributing editors.
  • Wikipedia: Analytical Review
  • The novel was generally well-received, but faced the possibility of a libel suit from Clarissa Graves, sister of Robert on whom Miss Bohun, one of the novel's characters, may have been based.
  • Wikipedia: Olivia Manning
  • The precedent-setting case, which reached the Tennessee Supreme Court, was decided in his favor as regards the lost income, but against him regarding libel.
  • Wikipedia: Temple Israel (Memphis, Tennessee)
  • The same year, the Duke sued for libel after a book appeared accusing him of having his valet Neale kill Sellis, and the jury found against the author.
  • Wikipedia: Ernest Augustus I of Hanover