• (as) cold [hard] as (a) stone
  • 石のようにかたい;暖かい血が通っていない
  • a stone wall
  • 石べい
  • give a stone for a loaf
  • パンを求める者に石を与える;助けるふりをして愚弄ぐろうする(◆聖書より)
  • layers of stone
  • 石の層
  • set a stone rolling
  • 石を転がす;とんでもない結果になるようなことをやり出す
  • stone a car
  • 車に石を投げつける
  • stone a person to death
  • 石をぶつけて人を殺す(◇昔の刑罰)
  • stone madness
  • まったくばかげたこと
  • stone-dead
  • 完全に死んだ
  • throw [cast] stones [a stone] at ...
  • …に石をぶつける;…を非難する
  • A 10.5 feet (3.2 m) stone wall was built around the garden, enclosing an area from the gatehouse to the south end of the Roman fort.
  • Wikipedia: Brougham Castle
  • A few, such as Luxor and Philae, were converted into churches, but many more went completely disused, and over time locals carried off their stones to use as material for new buildings.
  • Wikipedia: Egyptian temple
  • A full-size non-working replica was erected on the original stone base in August 1974; it includes a blade made from a casting of the original, which as of 2011 is displayed in the Bankfield Museum in Boothtown on the outskirts of Halifax.
  • Wikipedia: Halifax Gibbet
  • A stone staircase began on the west side of the keep before turning and meeting the forebuilding, which could be entered by crossing a drawbridge across a gap 9 feet (2.7 m) wide.
  • Wikipedia: Rochester Castle
  • According to local legend, the cherubim carved in stone above the golden niches and in the pillars' capitals are illustrations of children living on campus at the time of the church's construction.
  • Wikipedia: Stanford Memorial Church
  • Another stone located on capitol grounds is the GAR Stone, a memorial to American Civil War veterans who fought for the Union.
  • Wikipedia: Michigan State Capitol
  • Carey's Mill Bridge was built of Ham stone in the 18th century and named after Carey's Mill which originally occupied the site.
  • Wikipedia: River Parrett
  • Despite vigorous cleaning, the porous nature of the stone used in the Shrine's construction meant that the slogan remained faintly visible for over 20 years.
  • Wikipedia: Shrine of Remembrance
  • Diamond enhancements are specific treatments performed on natural or synthetic diamonds (usually those already cut and polished into a gem), which are designed to better the gemological characteristics of the stone in one or more ways.
  • Wikipedia: Diamond
  • Even before the Old Kingdom, the ancient Egyptians had developed a glassy material known as faience, which they treated as a type of artificial semi-precious stone.
  • Wikipedia: Ancient Egypt
  • For example, when Tattershall Castle was built between 1430 and 1450, there was plenty of stone available nearby, but the owner, Lord Cromwell, chose to use brick.
  • Wikipedia: Castle
  • His monumental Gothic stone civic buildings in Christchurch, which would not be out of place in Oxford or Cambridge, are an amazing achievement over adversity of materials.
  • Wikipedia: Benjamin Mountfort
  • In 1937 each stone on the upstream side was removed and numbered and the bridge widened; the stone facing of the upstream side was then reassembled and the bridge reopened to traffic in 1940.
  • Wikipedia: Richmond Bridge, London
  • In 1952, Adams, Holden & Pearson were appointed by English Electric's chairman, Sir George Nelson, and Holden designed a monolithic stone building around a courtyard.
  • Wikipedia: Charles Holden
  • In late 2010, the beer producer launched a website to tell about the making of the beer product line and the story of the restoration of the stones.
  • Wikipedia: Santa Maria de Ovila
  • Knobs, indentations and dovetails were used to form joints between stones.
  • Wikipedia: Borobudur
  • Mary also expanded the buildings used by the Knights of Windsor in the Lower Ward, using stone from Reading Abbey.
  • Wikipedia: Windsor Castle